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Frank A. Chambers Excellence in Air Pollution Control Award

Frank A. Chambers Excellence in Air Pollution Control Award

 
Frank A. Chambers (1885–1951) was a founder of the Smoke Prevention Association of America, a forerunner of the Air & Waste Management Association, and was instrumental in building the foundation for A&WMA. His pioneering ideas for smoke control were employed by many cities across the United States. The Frank A. Chambers Excellence in Air Pollution Control Award is presented annually by the Association for outstanding achievement in the science and art of air pollution control. It requires technical accomplishments considered to be major contributions, the merits of which have been widely recognized by persons in the field. The coverage is intentionally broad, since it recognizes achievement in any line of technical endeavor in air pollution control, from pure research to applied science.
 
A&WMA presents the 2019 Frank A. Chambers Excellence in Air Pollution Control Award to H. Christopher Frey, Ph.D., the Glenn E. and Phyllis J. Futrell Distinguished University Professor at North Carolina State University (NC State), for his contributions in the area of air pollution research and development.
 
Dr. Frey has been a member of the faculty of the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering at NC State for 25 years. He is an internationally recognized expert in air quality. His research addresses the continuum between energy use, emissions, and exposure to air pollution, as well as tools and techniques for developing policy relevant insights.
 
Dr. Frey demonstrated and transferred into practice probabilistic methods in emission inventories and exposure assessment. He was the Lead Author for guidance by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) regarding uncertainty in greenhouse gas emission inventories. Dr. Frey contributed to the World Health Organization working group that developed guidance on uncertainty in exposure assessment.
 
Dr. Frey is a pioneer in the use of Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS) to measure the activity, energy use, and emissions of onroad and nonroad vehicles under real-world conditions. Dr. Frey’s work addresses a wide variety of study objectives. Examples include quantification of the contribution of cold start emissions to trip total emissions, evaluation of the effect of road type, level of service, road geometry, road grade, and traffic control on emissions, assessment of driving behavior, emissions comparison of alternative routes, and comparison of transport modes (e.g., passenger rail versus car).
 
Dr. Frey measured the effect of biodiesel usage on emissions from diesel trucks, nonroad diesel equipment such as motor graders, and passenger trains, finding that B20 biodiesel can lead to significant reductions in engine exhaust particulate matter emissions under actual operating conditions. His work on heavy-duty vehicles demonstrated the real-world effectiveness of emission control technologies such as diesel particle filters and selective catalytic reduction under actual operating conditions, while quantifying driving cycles specific to particular types of vocational trucks. The data he collected on light duty vehicles were used to assess the accuracy of fuel economy ratings; whether real-world emission rates are consistent with emission standards; and the effects of technologies, road type, road grade, driving cycles, and other factors on real-world emissions. Data such as these are necessary to the development of more accurate estimates of vehicle emissions and to prioritizing emissions management strategies to most effectively reduce real-world emissions.
 
Dr. Frey demonstrated the conceptual basis that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) incorporates into its national MOVES model based on second-by-second data and Vehicle Specific Power (VSP). He has developed and applied models based on PEMS data to quantify the effects of driving cycles, vehicle technology, fuels, road types, and other factors with respect to variability in energy use and emission rates. Dr. Frey led the development of a link-based regional vehicle emissions model used to assess the relative impact of fleet turnover, adoption of new vehicle technologies, and changes in land-use patterns on urban scale regional energy use and emissions. Recent research has focused on quantifying the effect of fuels, powertrains, bus size, passenger load, and driving cycles on transit bus energy use and emissions, and the effect of train consist, rail grade and curvature, and inter-run variability in speed trajectories on real-world energy use and emissions of passenger rail systems. This work identifies opportunities to reduce the energy and emissions intensity of passenger transport based on mode choice, improved operation, fuels, and emission controls.
 
Dr. Frey has led projects to improve the methodological underpinning of simulation models of inter-individual variability in population-based air pollution exposure models, and to design. Dr. Frey authored and presented the 48th Annual A&WMA Critical Review on “Trends in Onroad Transportation Energy and Emissions” (2018). He is a past member of the A&WMA Board of Directors and is a Fellow Member of the Association.
 


H. Christopher Frey, Ph.D.